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Jeanne Cavelos, Director and Primary Instructor

 

    Jeanne Cavelos The creation of the Odyssey Writing Workshops Charitable Trust, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization devoted to helping developing writers of fantastic fiction improve their work, has been a dream of Jeanne's which she has worked to make a reality.

    Jeanne is a writer, editor, scientist, and teacher. She began her professional life as an astrophysicist and mathematician, teaching astronomy at Michigan State University and Cornell University, and working in the Astronaut Training Division at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

    But soon her love of science fiction led her to earn her MFA in creative writing. She moved into a career in publishing, becoming a senior editor at Bantam Doubleday Dell, where she created and launched the Abyss imprint of innovative horror and the Cutting Edge imprint of noir literary fiction. She also ran the science fiction/fantasy publishing program. In addition, she edited a wide range of fiction and nonfiction. She worked with such authors as William F. Nolan, Joan Vinge, Robert Anton Wilson, Dennis Etchison, Tanith Lee, Kathe Koja, Poppy Z. Brite, J. M. Dillard, David Wingrove, Barry Gifford, Patrick McCabe, and Peter Dickinson. In her eight years in New York publishing, she edited numerous award-winning and best-selling authors and gained a reputation for discovering and nurturing new writers. Jeanne won the World Fantasy Award for her editing.

    Jeanne left New York to find a balance that would allow her to do her own writing and work in a more in-depth way with writers. She runs Jeanne Cavelos Editorial Services, a full-service freelance company that provides editing, ghostwriting, consulting, and critiquing services to publishers, book packagers, agents, and authors. Among its clients are major publishers and best-selling and award-winning writers.

    Jeanne has had seven books published by major publishers. Her last novel to hit the stores was Invoking Darkness, the third volume in her best-selling trilogy The Passing of the Techno-Mages (Del Rey), set in the Babylon 5 universe. The Sci-Fi Channel called the trilogy "A revelation for Babylon 5 fans. . . . Not 'television episodic' in look and feel. They are truly novels in their own right." Her book The Science of Star Wars (St. Martin's) was chosen by the New York Public Library for its recommended reading list. The Science of The X-Files (Berkley) was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award. Jeanne is currently writing a near-future science thriller about genetic manipulation, titled Fatal Spiral.

    Jeanne has published short fiction and nonfiction in many magazines and anthologies. She has also ghostwritten several bestselling books.

    The Many Faces of Van Helsing, an anthology edited by Jeanne, was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award. The editors at Barnes and Noble called it "brilliant. . . . Arguably the strongest collection of supernatural stories to be released in years."

    Since she loves working with developing writers, Jeanne created and serves as primary instructor at the Odyssey Writing Workshop, the only major workshop of its kind run by an editor. Jeanne designed the workshop to combine an advanced curriculum that allows writers to improve their craft with detailed, in-depth feedback on their work. In 2010, Jeanne launched Odyssey Online Classes to help writers all over the world improve their skills in specific, targeted areas. Jeanne oversees the courses offered and teaches one online course most years. In 2015, Jeanne was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for her work as Odyssey director and instructor.

    She is also an English lecturer at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, where she teaches fiction writing and essay writing.

    Jeanne has spoken widely on writing, publishing, science, and science fiction at venues as varied as the Smithsonian Institute, the Air Force Revolutionary Technologies Division, the Intel International Science Fair, the American Chemical Society, Dartmouth College, the Discovery Channel, the History Channel, the Science Channel, Turner Entertainment, the Art Bell radio program, and many radio shows, bookstores, and conventions. More information is on her site, www.jeannecavelos.com.




2018 Scheduled Guest Lecturers

 
  • Theodora Goss

    Theodora Goss Theodora Goss was born in Hungary and spent her childhood in various European countries before her family moved to the United States. Although she grew up on the classics of English literature, her writing has been influenced by an Eastern European literary tradition in which the boundaries between realism and the fantastic are often ambiguous. Her publications include the short story collection In the Forest of Forgetting (2006); Interfictions (2007), a short story anthology coedited with Delia Sherman; Voices from Fairyland (2008), a poetry anthology with critical essays and a selection of her own poems; The Thorn and the Blossom (2012), a novella in a two-sided accordion format; the poetry collection Songs for Ophelia (2014), and debut novel The Strange Case of the Alchemist's Daughter (2017). Her work has been translated into twelve languages. She has been a finalist for the Nebula, Crawford, Locus, Seiun, and Mythopoeic Awards, and on the Tiptree Award Honor List. Her poems "Octavia is Lost in the Hall of Masks" (2003) and "Rose Child" (2016) won the Rhysling Award and her short story "Singing of Mount Abora" (2007) won the World Fantasy Award. Her next novel, European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman, will be published in 2018 by Saga Press.


 




 
  • Nisi Shawl

    Nisi Shawl Nisi Shawl wrote the 2016 Nebula finalist and Tiptree Honor novel Everfair, an alternate history in which the Congo overthrows King Leopold II's genocidal regime, and the 2008 Tiptree Award-winning short story collection Filter House. In 2005 she co-wrote Writing the Other: A Practical Approach, now considered the standard text on diverse character representation in the imaginative genres, and the basis of her years of online and in-person classes of the same name. She is a founder of the inclusivity-focused Carl Brandon Society and has served on the Clarion West Writers Workshop's board of directors for nineteen years.

    Shawl's dozens of acclaimed stories have appeared in Analog and Asimov's Magazines, among many other publications; most recently her "Everfair-adjacent" story "Vulcanization" was selected as one of twenty offered in Houghton Mifflin Harcourt's Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy. She has edited and co-edited several fiction and nonfiction anthologies such as Stories for Chip: A Tribute to Samuel R. Delany; and Strange Matings: Science Fiction, Feminism, African American Voices, and Octavia E. Butler; both finalists for the Locus Award. Currently she's in the final stages of editing New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction by People of Color, to be published this fall by Solaris.


 




 
  • Scott H. Andrews

    Scott H. Andrews Scott H. Andrews lives in Virginia with his wife, two cats, nine guitars, a dozen overflowing bookcases, and hundreds of beer bottles from all over the world. He writes, teaches college chemistry, and is Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of the five-time Hugo Award finalist and World Fantasy Award-winning online fantasy magazine Beneath Ceaseless Skies.

    Scott is a graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop; his literary short fiction has won a $1000 prize from the Briar Cliff Review, and his genre short fiction has appeared in Space & Time, Crossed Genres, and Ann VanderMeer's Weird Tales.

    He has lectured on short fiction, secondary-world fantasy, editing, magazine publishing, audio podcasting, and beer on dozens of convention panels at multiple Worldcons, World Fantasy conventions, and regional conventions in the Northeast and Midwest. He is a three-time finalist for the World Fantasy Award, and he celebrates International Stout Day at least once a year.


 




 
  • E. C. Ambrose

    E. C. Ambrose E. C. Ambrose, writing under the name Elaine Isaak, is the author of The Singer's Crown (Eos, 2005), and its sequels The Eunuch's Heir and The Bastard Queen, as well as the "Tales of Bladesend" epic novella series. As E. C. Ambrose, she writes The Dark Apostle series of dark historical fantasy novels about medieval surgery. The Dark Apostle started with Elisha Barber (DAW, 2013), described in a starred Library Journal review as, "beautifully told, painfully elegant." Additional volumes Elisha Magus, Elisha Rex and Elisha Mancer followed, with a final volume forthcoming in 2018. Her short fiction has won the Tenebris Press Flash Fiction contest and appeared in the New Hampshire Pulp Fiction series, Fireside magazine and Uncle John's Bathroom Reader.

    In addition to her novels, she has written how-to articles for The Writer magazine, nonfiction at Clarkesworld, and authored the Lady Blade fantasy writing column at AlienSkin magazine for three years. Her speaking engagements have included local chapters of Romance Writers of America as well as other writing groups, the World Science Fiction and World Fantasy Conventions.

    Elaine attended the Rhode Island School of Design for three years, and studied speculative fiction at the Odyssey Writing Workshop, where she is pleased to return as an instructor. A former professional costumer specializing in animal mascots, Elaine lives in New Hampshire with her family where she works part-time as an adventure guide. In addition to writing and teaching, Elaine enjoys taiko drumming, rock climbing, and all manner of fiber arts.

    Elaine's research interests include the history of technology and medicine, Mongolian history and culture, medieval history, in particular medieval medicine and the history of England. Her research and travel has taken her to Germany, England, France, India, Nepal, China and Mongolia as well as many United States destinations. In order to write the best books she can, Elaine learned how to hunt with a falcon, clear a building of possible assailants, pull traction on a broken limb, and fire an AR-15. She is eager to see where writing will take her next.

    Visit www.TheDarkApostle.com or www.ElaineIsaak.com to find out why you do not want to be her hero.


 




 
  • Elizabeth Hand

    Elizabeth Hand Elizabeth Hand is the bestselling author of thirteen genre-spanning novels and four collections of short fiction. Her work has received the World Fantasy Award (four times), Nebula Award (twice), Shirley Jackson Award (twice), International Horror Guild Award (three times), the Mythopoeic Award, and the James Tiptree, Jr. Award, among others, and several of her books have been New York Times and Washington Post Notable Books. Her recent, critically acclaimed novels featuring Cass Neary, "one of literature's great noir anti-heroes" [Katherine Dunn]—Generation Loss, Available Dark, and Hard Light—have been compared to those of Patricia Highsmith. With Paul Witcover, Hand created DC Comics' early 1990s cult series Anima, whose riot grrl superheroine dealt with homeless teenagers, drug abuse, the AIDS epidemic and racial violence, and featured DC Comics' first openly gay teenager (the series also once guest-starred Conan O'Brien). Her 1999 play "The Have-Nots" was a finalist in London's Fringe Theater Festival and went on to play at the Battersea Arts Center. She has written numerous novelizations of films, including Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys, and a popular series of Star Wars books for middle grade children. She is a longtime critic and book reviewer whose work appears regularly in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, the Boston Review, among many others, and writes a regular column for the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Her books and short fiction have been translated into numerous languages and have been optioned for film and television. Hand teaches at the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing, and recently joined the faculty of the Maine College of Art. She divides her time between the coast of Maine and North London, and is working on the fourth Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners.


 




 
  • Gary A. Braunbeck

    Gary A. Braunbeck Gary A. Braunbeck was born in Newark, Ohio (the city that serves as the model for the fictitious Cedar Hill in a majority of his novels and stories) and wrote his first story in the 7th grade at St. Francis de Sales Catholic School. It wasn't very good. He wrote his next one while still in the 7th grade. It was much better, but it also bought him several sessions with both a psychologist and a priest. Skipping ahead several decades, he has published 25 books, over 200 short stories, and co-edited 2 anthologies. Though he is best known as a writer of horror and dark fantasy, he has also published in the fields of mystery, suspense, science fiction, fantasy, bizarro, Western, and mainstream literature. His nonfiction writing book, To Each Their Darkness, has been used as a text by several college writing courses. His work has won numerous awards, including 5 Bram Stoker Awards, an International Horror Guild Award, 3 Shocklines "Shocker" Awards, a Dark Scribe Magazine Black Quill Award, and a World Fantasy Award nomination. His short story "Rami Temporalis," was turned into the Parsec Award-winning short film "One of Those Faces" by director Earl Newton. Gary is an adjunct professor at Seton Hill University, Pennsylvania, where he teaches in an innovative Master's degree program in Writing Popular Fiction. Gary currently lives in Worthington, Ohio, with his wife, Bram Stoker Award-winning poet and novelist Lucy A. Snyder, a guilty conscience, and 5 cats that do not hesitate to draw blood when he neglects to feed them on time.



    And more 2018 guests to come!

 



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Updated Nov 28, 2017
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